Semicolons

“Here is a lesson in creative writing. First rule: Do not use semicolons. They are transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing. All they do is show you’ve been to college.”

Kurt Vonnegut, (1922 – 2007)

Kurt Vonnegut is a wise man. I read one of his books a while ago, but I’d like to make the time for more of his words.

About Clive Andrews

- digital and social - - training and consultancy -
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6 Responses to Semicolons

  1. Simon Aughton says:

    What’s wrong with semi-colons? You can use them to connect sentences; normally this is used where the second sentence relates to an idea in the first. You can also use them to divide list item, where the items themselves are particularly long, such as: a list of punctutation marks, including semi-colons; an ironically titled blog in which to list them; and a pedantic and humourless comment upon said blog.

  2. Clive Andrews says:

    It was hard work just reading that, let alone writing it!

    I think you’ve proved Vonnegut’s point rather well there, Simon.

  3. becsterishbecster says:

    I quite like the use of semi-colons. In the Regulatory world it can really help get a point across. Also, Regulatory makes you more of a pedant than the average pendant because we are paid to overemphasize rules and minor details to our benefit. I can’t get excited about apostrophes though.

    I have never been to college only school and university. I believe that this is also the case for Simon.

  4. Simon Aughton says:

    “It was hard work just reading that, let alone writing it!”

    It was easy to write; I use semi-colons on a daily basis.

    And how much more difficult would it have been to read, if I had used commas instead or simply despatched with punctution altogether?

  5. Abi Rhodes says:

    did you notice if KV used any semi-colons?

  6. Nick Sayers says:

    What are semicolons for? Why, making winky emoticons of course! 😉

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